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Editors' Pick: The Bolton Bulletin

Today and tomorrow, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee considers John Bolton's nomination to the post of U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Why is he meeting such opposition? Here, a compilation of the Prospect 's coverage of Bush's new diplomat. Control Freak by Wade Boese John Bolton would rather keep America free of commitments than keep the world free of nuclear weapons. [4/7/2005] Ambassador or Embitterer by Nancy E. Soderberg John Bolton could help the administration turn the corner -- or turn the world away. [4/5/2005] Conversion Diversion by Mark Leon Goldberg Don't be fooled by John Bolton's confirmation doubletalk. He'll revert to form instantly if he's sent to the UN. [4/4/2005] The Bolton Fights (Plural) by Michael Tomasky John Bolton's nomination is worth going to the barricades -- especially because he can be beaten. [April 2005] Hawks Taking Wing by Robert Kuttner It's wishful thinking to cast Paul Wolfowitz's and John Bolton's new jobs as demotions. [3/24/2005...

Welcome Aboard, Joe

American Prospect Executive Editor Michael Tomasky announced today that the Prospect has hired Joe Conason to serve in a new position as the magazine's Investigative Editor. Conason, the well-known investigative journalist, political columnist, and best-selling author, will oversee the Prospect 's new emphasis on investigative reporting. He will assign, edit, and write articles, and he will join the magazine formally on January 24. Conason has a long history in investigative journalism. In the 1980s, he wrote articles about the secret U.S. real estate holdings of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos --articles that ultimately helped bring down the dictator's regime. In the 1990s, he uncovered details about the conservatives who were plotting to destroy the Clinton presidency, revealing the existence of the “Arkansas Project” that poured millions of dollars into investigating the Clintons' lives. With Gene Lyons, he co-authored the best-selling book, The Hunting of the President ,...

Prospect Conference on C-SPAN2

Beginning at 5:53 tonight, the TAP emergency summit conference on the foreign policy crisis, held last Tuesday and Wesndesay and featuring Wesley Clark, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Theodore Sorensen, and many more, will be rebroadcast . The speeches by Clark and Brzezinski are two of the most effective challenges to America's current foreign policy that we've heard. Here is the original schedule .

Head Rush

The news that Rush Limbaugh will be spending the month trying to kick his OxyContin habit provides a tempting opportunity to kick a thug while he's down. Rush, after all, told his audience just eight years ago that "we have laws against selling drugs, pushing drugs, using drugs, importing drugs. And the laws are good because we know what happens to people in societies and neighborhoods which become consumed by them. And so if people are violating the law by doing drugs, they ought to be accused and they ought to be convicted and they ought to be sent up." So, is it time to give the king of talk radio a taste of his own medicine and let him see what's become of America's penal system after 30 years of "tough on crime" hysterics? After all, in the same broadcast he specifically called for the imprisonment of more white drug offenders as a solution to the well-known racial disparities in the justice system. To quote the man himself, "What this says to me is that too many whites are...

Book 'Em

Let's just agree up front that there's no augury or metaphor in it, but the fact remains that South Dakota Sen. Tom Daschle spoke at length for the first time about his new book, which is due out in November, at something called the Deadwood Pavilion. Addressing an audience at his state's first-ever book fair, Daschle said he wrote the tome, titled Like No Other Time, because he had "a compelling story to tell," adding, somewhat cosmically, that "history is not written at a constant pace. It is sometimes accelerated." "Accelerate," meanwhile, is undoubtedly what many Democratic senators -- perhaps Daschle included -- wish they could do with the number of days remaining in the term of their colleague from Georgia, Zell Miller. That's because Miller, too, has turned authorial; but where advance word on Daschle's book suggests that it will be a polite paean to his colleagues and their will to soldier on after 9-11, Miller's product (published in October) is of a different character. A...

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